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Notes from the IFS Desk

Pablo Kjølseth, Fall 2016

The IFS turned 75 this year! It was a treat to spend the summer perusing the archives to see the changes the program has gone through over all these years. Change is inevitable, and anyone holding this calendar will notice a big change in layout strategy. We’ve abandoned the week-by-week grid in favor of a calendar that now goes show-by-show. This allows us to include the First Person Cinema and Celebrating Stan events with the regular IFS programming in one layout. This semester’s calendar also begins a bit earlier (with a Sneak Preview of Derek Cianfrance’s latest film, The Light Between Oceans, on August 30th), and ends later (with offerings into December).

In addition, we’ve partnered with several other departments and programs here on campus for C.U. at the Movies. These are movies that various faculty members across campus have either selected or supported, with each giving special introductions before the show.

I’d also like to thank the Japan Foundation and  The Tourneés Festival for their program inclusions.

On the topic of inevitable change, please look closely at the latest IFS parking map to best plan out your evening of movie-watching. Euclid Autopark will be unavailable in the fall due to construction, but there are still free parking options that are a small walk away, or pay options that land you even closer.

CU At the Movies

C.U. at the Movies is made possible in part by funding from the CU Boulder College of Arts and Sciences and support from the following departments:

  • Film Studies Program
  • Humanities Program
  • English Department
  • Center for Asian Studies
  • French Department
  • Department of German & Slavic Languages

The Tourneés Festival

The Tourneés Festival is made possible with the support of the Cultural Services of the French Embassy in the U.S., the Centre National du Cinéma et de l'Image Animée (CNC), the French American Cultural Fund, Florence Gould Foundation and Highbrow Entertainment.

  • Francofonia
  • Jauja
  • Far from Men
  • Reality
  • Phantom Boy
  • Pierrot le Fou

Japan Foundation

Screenings of these films made possible by generous support from The Japan Foundation and the Center for Asian Studies at CU Boulder.

  • Cinema Kabuki
  • Last Life in the Unvierse

Now Showing

  Muenzinger Auditorium7:30 only  

Francofonia

Francofonia
Hosted by Tom Roberts

Alexander Sokurov’s latest. Hosted by Tom Roberts, Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures.

The Tourneés Festival is made possible with the support of the Cultural Services of the French Embassy in the U.S., the Centre National du Cinéma et de l'Image Animée (CNC), the French American Cultural Fund, Florence Gould Foundation and Highbrow Entertainment.

Alexander Sokurov's quasi-documentary Francofonia is a brilliant meditation on art, on war - and what happens to art when nations go to war.

In a bold mash-up of archival footage, reenactments, and reimaginings, the filmmaker examines how France's iconic museum, the Louvre, came into being. And how its palatial galleries - and the masterpieces in its collection - survived World War II.

There's everything here from newsreels of Nazi troops rolling into Paris to a scene of Sokurov himself Skyping to the captain of a storm-tossed Russian freighter carrying priceless artworks.

It was June 14, 1940, when German tanks rumbled down the Champs-Elysee - a Champs-Elysee eerily devoid of people. More than two million Parisians had already fled the city, the writing was on the wall. And on the walls of the Louvre: empty spaces where paintings had been taken down and shipped to safe hiding places in the countryside.

Much of Francofonia centers around the real-life characters Jacques Jaujard, director of the Louvre at the time of the Occupation, and Franz Graf Wolff-Metternich, an official high up in Germany's Paris command.

As with the complicit relationship between another French cultural figure and another Nazi described in Volker Schlöndorff's 2014 film, Diplomacy, Jaujard (played by Louis-Do de Lencquesaing) and Wolff-Metternich (Benjamin Utzerath) were enemies on paper. But the two became collaborators, plotting to save the Louvre from destruction and to halt the shipment of artworks to Germany as trophies of war.

The camera in Francofonia prowls the corridors of the Louvre, stopping to take in ancient Assyrian friezes, the Mona Lisa. And then it soars over the museum's rooftops, the skyline of Paris, flying back into history, the modern buildings erased before our eyes. Suddenly the figure of Napoleon (Vincent Nemeth) is wandering the Louvre, too, stopping at his own portrait.

History is enshrined here. And in Sokurov's film, the art of centuries breathes anew.

— Steven Rea, Philadelphia Inquirer

Francofonia

Showing at Muenzinger Auditorium

France, 2015, in Russian [w/ Eng Subtitles], Color, 88 min

remind me export to calendar recommend

Coming soon to the IFS

Jauja

Muenzinger Auditorium Jauja 
 Sep 27 

Chevalier

Muenzinger Auditorium Chevalier 
 Sep 29 

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